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Cynthia Kim is an autistic writer and entrepreneur. Her books include I Think I Might Be Autistic: A Guide to Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis and Self-Discovery for Adults, and Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate.

Kim discovered her Asperger Syndrome at age 42. She is married with children.

Writing

"I write mainly for myself, but I'm always thrilled when someone says that they're able to relate to something I've written or that it's been helpful to them."[1]
Kim has taken a break from writing, citing a decline in her language abilities.[2] She noted that even writing once a week has been difficult for her.[3] The break commenced in January 2015.

Musings of an Aspie

Kim writes about autism in her blog Musings of an Aspie. Many of her posts describe aspects of autism, allowing autistic people and their loved ones to understand better.

Kim's writing style is accessible and clear. She balances dry facts with anecdotes that give her work a personal touch. Kim finds ways to add humor to ordinary situations. "When I visit the zoo, I always leave thinking that maybe I was a primatologist in another life. Or a monkey," she observes.[4]

I Think I Might Be Autistic (2013)

I Think I Might Be Autistic: A Guide to Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis and Self-Discovery for Adults describes Kim's diagnosis process and journey to acceptance. It includes tips on navigating diagnosis, adjusting, and living well as an autistic adult.[5]

Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate (2014)

Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate: A User Guide to an Asperger Life delves into living with the quirks and challenges of autism (specifically Asperger Syndrome). She shares her personal story and offers advice for autistic adults.[6]

Autism Parenting Magazine

Cynthia Kim is a writer at Autism Parenting Magazine, writing articles for parents of autistic children and autistic parents.[7]

Stimtastic

Cynthia Kim is founder of Stimtastic, a company that sells stim toys at affordable prices and celebrates the joys of stimming. Its name is a combination of the words stimming and fantastic.

Stimtastic has a notable involvement in the autistic community, hosting giveaways, design contests, and a photo gallery where users can submit "photos of your happy stimming selves."[8]

Positions and Activism

Cynthia Kim views autism acceptance as important, recognizing her personal journey towards self-acceptance and considering it as a "well being practice."[3]

"There's this popular notion that having an autistic family member automatically means the ruin of a family. People assume that an autistic partner will be a burden -- that they'll be unable to love and care for the other family members like an allistic person would. I know so many autistic adults who are great parents and who are in happy, successful relationships. We aren't the exceptions."[1]

This is Autism Flash Blog

Cynthia Kim started the "This is Autism" flash blog in response to Autism Speaks' Call to Action (which portrayed autism as a disaster). Its about page states its mission is to "tell the world what autism is in the words and works of autistic people and those who love and support them."[9]

The flash blog event took place on November 18, 2013.[10] Its participants included many members of the autistic community, from prominent Autistic activist Amy Sequenzia to ten-year-old Lief O'Neill.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Thinking Person's Guide to Autism: Autism Acceptance Month 2014: Cynthia Kim
  2. Musings of an Aspie: Where Am I Going, Where Have I Been
  3. 3.0 3.1 Musings of an Aspie: Acceptance as a Well Being Practice
  4. Musings of an Aspie: Who and What
  5. Amazon.com: I Think I Might Be Autistic
  6. Amazon.com: Nerdy, Shy, and Socially Inappropriate
  7. Autism Parenting Magazine: Cynthia Kim
  8. Stimtastic: Photo Gallery
  9. About "This is Autism" Flashblog
  10. This is Autism Flash Blog

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